Be Nice, Learn to Talk

Why are we so talkative?  Why can’t some people SHUT UP?

Turns out that you and I aren’t the only ones trying to figure this out.

Some of those brainiac types are asking this question as well.  Better yet, they may have some answers.

Those brainiacs are what journalists call “scientists.”  Yes, those guys.  The ones asking questions based on lots of data that other “scientists” can use to get the same answers.  Big deal.

Well, it is a big deal, actually.

You see, these science guys went and looked at some birds.  Why birds?

Well, there’s lots of different types of birds for one.

And these birds, well, they seem to have this talking thing similar to us people.  As people we don’t call it talking.  We call it singing, or bird calls, or song, or whatever.  But birds seem to know what they are saying.

It turns out that some birds aren’t very social.  In fact, they are downright not nice.  Kind of like some neighbors I’ve had.  Birds called Munia are like that.  Not so social.

That’s compared to the Bengalese finch, a bird that’s been domesticated for 250 years.

Guess what?  The finch has complex songs and can figure out what you might be thinking.  The Munia, not so much.  No complex songs.  Doesn’t care what you are thinking.

You might say, so what about the birds already.  Good point.

Turns out that 50 generations of fox have also started showing these traits.  Bonobos.  We already know about cats, dogs, horses and cattle.  But at least in the case of the birds, there is a direct relationship between talking (alright, singing) and human language.

Here’s the kicker.  Good old Charles Robert Darwin suggested a LONG time ago that perhaps, just perhaps, people domesticated themselves.  It’s long been known that domesticated animals don’t have as much hair and take much longer to “grow up.”

That growing up time can be used to learn stuff.  Like talking.

So the next time you want to say something, say something nice.  Because, after all, if you weren’t nice to begin with, you probably wouldn’t be talking.

Thanks for stopping by.

By the way, the source article is from Science, 3 August 2018, volume 361, issue 6401, page 436-7.  Written by Michael Erard and Catherine Matacic

 

 

 

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